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Jan
2001

How effectively can groups of people make yes-or-no decisions? To answer this question, we used signal-detection theory to model the behavior of groups of human participants in a visual detection task. The detection model specifies how performance depends on the group's size, the competence of the members, the correlation among members' judgments, the constraints on member interaction, and the group's decision rule. The model also allows specification of performance efficiency, which is a measure of how closely a group's performance matches the statistically optimal group.
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https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/6056/7ed080b61f86c00dc915e8
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http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/rev/108/1/183.pdf
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To develop and test a tool for evaluating the performance of working groups in the institutional health care setting and to discuss its utility for pharmacists and other health care providers.
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Apr
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Apr
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Nov
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Adding distracters to a display impairs performance on visual tasks (i.e. the set-size effect).

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