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Dec
2001

Co-operation between the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-coded leader protein EBNA-LP and the nuclear antigen EBNA2 appears to be critical for efficient virus-induced B cell transformation. Here we report the genetic analysis of EBNA-LP function using two transient co-transfection assays of co-operativity, activation of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) expression from a resident EBV genome in Akata-BL cells and activation of an EBNA2-responsive reporter construct. Small deletions were introduced into each of five conserved regions (CRs) of EBNA-LP sequence present in type 1 and type 2 EBV strains and in several primate lymphocryptovirus EBNA-LP homologues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/0022-1317-82-12-3067DOI ListingPossible


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Nov
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Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) EBNA-LP is a latent protein whose function is not fully understood. Recent studies have shown that EBNA-LP may be an important EBNA2 cofactor by enhancing EBNA2 stimulation of the latency C and LMP-1 promoters. To further our understanding of EBNA-LP function, we have introduced a series of mutations into evolutionarily conserved regions and tested the mutant proteins for the ability to enhance EBNA2 stimulation of the latency C and LMP-1 promoters.

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Sep
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The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded leader protein EBNA-LP is made up of several 66-amino-acid repeats (the W1W2 domains) linked to a unique 45-amino-acid C-terminal sequence (the Y1Y2 domain). This protein is highly expressed along with a second nuclear antigen, EBNA-2, during the initial stages of virus-induced B-cell transformation. While EBNA-2's essential role in transformation as a transcriptional activatory is well documented, very little is known about EBNA-LP function except that recombinant viruses lacking the EBNA-LP Y1Y2 exons show reduced, but still detectable, transforming ability.

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Feb
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Self-association of viral proteins is important for many of their functions, including enzymatic, transcriptional, and transformational activities. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen leader protein (EBNA-LP) contains various numbers of W1W2 repeats and a unique carboxyl-terminal Y1Y2 domain. It was reported that EBNA-LP associates with a variety of cellular proteins and plays a critical role in EBV-induced transformation.

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Jan
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The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) EBNA-LP and EBNA2 proteins are the first to be synthesized during establishment of latent infection in B lymphocytes. EBNA2 is a key transcriptional regulator of both viral and cellular gene expression and is essential for EBV-induced immortalization of B lymphocytes. EBNA-LP is also important for EBV-induced immortalization of B lymphocytes, but far less is known about the functional domains and cellular cofactors that mediate EBNA-LP function.

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