Helping You Find Full Text Journal Articles

Nov
2002

The authors describe domains of nonpharmacologic interventions for residents with dementia who are receiving long-term care. Special emphasis is placed on interventions involving the domains of inappropriate behavior, restraint reduction, and cognition. Illustrations of the salubrious effects of these interventions are presented.
Full Text Link Source Status
http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.53.11.1397DOI ListingPossible


Similar Publications

May
1995

Behavioral problems in nursing home residents are already common and are likely to increase in number with the "graying" of the population. Effective treatment is available, and a structured and logical approach to management is needed. Patients should be assessed to differentiate delirium from dementia, and possible precipitants of disturbed behavior should be investigated.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Sep
2012

A randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was undertaken to determine the efficacy of nonpharmacologic individualized interventions (individualized to address unmet needs such as boredom or pain) in decreasing agitation in persons with dementia.
Agitated nursing home residents with advanced dementia (from 9 nursing homes in 5 locations in Maryland, United States) were randomized into an intervention group (n = 89) and a placebo control group (n = 36). On the basis of data from baseline assessment, a systematic methodology for individualizing nonpharmacologic interventions, Treatment Routes for Exploring Agitation (TREA), was used with the intervention group: an unmet need was hypothesized, a corresponding treatment category was identified, and specifics of the treatment were chosen to fit the person's need, past identity, preferences, and abilities.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Nov
2013

In Germany, the number of people with dementia living in nursing homes is rapidly increasing. Providing adequate care for their special needs is a challenge for institutions and their staff members. Because of the growing number of people with dementia, changes to the conceptual orientation of nursing homes have occurred.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Dec
1969

Behavioral symptoms are common in nursing home residents with dementia, and have negative consequences for the residents, their families, staff members, and nondemented residents who live in close proximity to them. Special care units are intended to provide appropriate environments and methods of care that in turn are expected to reduce the incidence of behavioral symptoms. Studies of the effectiveness of special care units in reducing behavioral symptoms have had contradictory findings.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.
Back to top