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Apr
2003

Protein-protein interactions drive the assembly of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsid. A key interaction occurs between the C-terminal tail of the scaffold protein (pre-22a) and the major capsid protein (VP5). Previously (Z.
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Sep
2007

Protein-protein interactions drive the assembly of the herpes simplex virus type 1 capsid. A key interaction occurs between the C terminus of the scaffold protein and the N terminus of the major capsid protein (VP5). Results from alanine-scanning mutagenesis of hydrophobic residues in the N terminus of VP5 revealed seven residues (I27, L35, F39, L58, L65, L67, and L71) that reside in two predicted alpha helices (helix 1(22-42) and helix 2(58-72)) that are important for this bimolecular interaction.

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Jun
2001

During the assembly process of herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids, there is an essential interaction between the C-terminal tail of the scaffold proteins (22a and 21) and the major capsid protein (VP5). Recent studies of spontaneous revertant viruses that overcome a blocked maturation cleavage site of the scaffold proteins have shown that the N-terminus of VP5 is important for this interaction. One of the revertant viruses, PR7, encodes a second-site mutation at residue 69 of VP5 which unlike wild-type VP5 fails to interact with 22a and thus gives white colonies in the yeast two-hybrid assay.

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Dec
2011

VP23 is a key component of the triplex structure. The triplex, which is unique to herpesviruses, is a complex of three proteins, two molecules of VP23 which interact with a single molecule of VP19C. This structure is important for shell accretion and stability of the protein coat.

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Dec
2000

During assembly of the herpes simplex type 1 capsid, the major capsid protein VP5 interacts with the C-terminal residues of the scaffold proteins encoded by UL26 and UL26.5. Subsequent to capsid assembly the scaffold proteins are cleaved at the maturation site by a serine protease also encoded by UL26, thereby enabling the bulk of the scaffold proteins to be released from the capsid.

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