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Apr
2008

Although urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common hospital-acquired infection, there is little information about why hospitals use or do not use a range of available preventive practices. We thus conducted a multicenter study to understand better how US hospitals approach the prevention of hospital-acquired UTI.
This research is part of a larger study employing both quantitative and qualitative methods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/529589DOI ListingPossible


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Jan
2008

Although urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common hospital-acquired infection in the United States, to our knowledge, no national data exist describing what hospitals in the United States are doing to prevent this patient safety problem. We conducted a national study to examine the current practices used by hospitals to prevent hospital-acquired UTI.
We mailed written surveys to infection control coordinators at a national random sample of nonfederal US hospitals with an intensive care unit and >or=50 hospital beds (n=600) and to all Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals (n=119).

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May
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Preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), a common health care-associated infection, is important for improving the care of hospitalized patients and in meeting the goals for reduction of health care-associated infections set by the US Department of Health and Human Services.
To identify ways to enhance CAUTI prevention efforts based on the experiences of hospitals participating in the Michigan Health and Hospital Association Keystone Center for Patient Safety statewide program to reduce unnecessary use of urinary catheters (the Bladder Bundle).
Qualitative assessment of data collected through semistructured telephone interviews with key informants at 12 hospitals and in-person interviews and site visits at 3 of the 12 hospitals.

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Sep
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Healthcare-associated infection (HAI) is costly and causes substantial morbidity. We sought to understand why some hospitals were engaged in HAI prevention activities while others were not. Because preliminary data indicated that hospital leadership played an important role, we sought better to understand which behaviors are exhibited by leaders who are successful at implementing HAI prevention practices in US hospitals.

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Dec
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Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common hospital acquired infection. The major associated cause is indwelling urinary catheters. Currently there are many types of catheters available.

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