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Dec
1969

Sums of responses to behaviour checklist items are commonly used as outcome measures. We argue for the use of mean scores. For sets of responses registering absence and presence at different levels of intensity of behaviours we also show that mean scores may usefully be 'decomposed' into separate measures of the range and the intensity of problematic behaviours.
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