Helping You Find Full Text Journal Articles

Apr
2012

Research has suggested an abnormal acceleration in head circumference growth in children with autism within the first 12 months of life. This study aimed to examine head circumference at birth and head circumference growth rates in young children with autism and developmental delay, and young children with developmental delay without autism.
This study assessed head circumference at birth and rate of change in head circumference in young children with autism (n=86) and children with developmental delay without autism (n=40).
Full Text Link Source Status
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1754.2011.02238.xDOI ListingPossible


Similar Publications

Jun
2007

Previous research has demonstrated that children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder show an abnormal acceleration of head growth during the first year of life. This study attempts to replicate these findings and to determine whether overgrowth is associated with clinical outcome. Measurements of head circumference, body length, and body weight taken during the first 2 years of life were obtained from a sample of 35 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and compared to both national normative data (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and a control group of 37 healthy infants.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Dec
2004

It has been reported that children with autism and pervasive developmental disorder have a significantly smaller head circumference at birth and that their head circumference then increases disproportionately rapidly in the first year of life.
We attempted to replicate these findings using 15 narrowly defined autistic children from the National Collaborative Perinatal Project and approximately 40,000 nonautistic control subjects.
The autistic group had a slightly but not significantly larger head circumference at birth.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Feb
2005

Macrocephaly is one of the most consistent physical findings reported in autistic individuals. Previous studies attempted to determine if macrocephaly is associated with risk for autism. This study hypothesizes that an abnormal acceleration in head growth during early development, rather than macrocephaly, is associated with autism risk.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Dec
2005

While the neuroanatomical basis of autism is not yet known, evidence suggests that brain enlargement may be characteristic of this disorder. Inferences about the timing of brain enlargement have recently come from studies of head circumference (HC).
To examine brain volume and HC in individuals with autism as compared with control individuals.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.
Back to top