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Dec
2012

Sleep deprivation and cold air exposure are both experienced in occupational and military settings but the combined effects of these 2 stressors is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 53 hours of total sleep deprivation on thermoregulation during the rewarming phase (25°C air) after acute cold air exposure (10°C air).
Eight young men underwent 2 trials in which they either received 7 hours of sleep at night or were totally sleep deprived.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2012.05.004DOI ListingPossible


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This investigation evaluated the effects of 33 h of sleep deprivation on the thermoregulation in 12 male and female subjects (26.6 +/- 6.4 yrs) during 180 min of cold exposure in 12 degrees C air.

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Dec
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A disabled submarine (DISSUB) lacking power and/or environmental control will become cold, and the ambient air may become hypercapnic and hypoxic. This study examined if the combination of hypoxia, hypercapnia, and cold exposure would adversely affect thermoregulatory responses to acute cold exposure in survivors awaiting rescue. Seven male submariners (33 +/- 6 yrs) completed a series of cold-air tests (CAT) that consisted of 20-min at T(air) = 22 degrees C, followed by a linear decline (1 degrees C x min(-1)) in T(air) to 12 degrees C, which was then held constant for an additional 150-min.

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Dec
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The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 12 degrees C cold exposure for 180-minutes on the hormonal responses of sleep-deprived individuals.
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Dec
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It is well established that a combination of factors, including ethnicity, may influence an individual's response to cold stress. Previous work from our laboratory has demonstrated that when faced with a cold challenge, there is a similar response in heat production between Caucasian (CAU) and African American (AA) individuals that is accompanied by a differential response in core temperature. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of ethnicity (CAU vs AA) on the thermoregulatory response after acute cold exposure (ACE-REC, 25 degrees C air).

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