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Jan
2014

In the domain of working memory (WM), a sigmoid-shaped relationship between WM load and brain activation patterns has been demonstrated in younger adults. It has been suggested that age-related alterations of this pattern are associated with changes in neural efficiency and capacity. At the same time, WM training studies have shown that some older adults are able to increase their WM performance through training.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2463-13.2014DOI ListingPossible


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Oct
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Jan
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