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Jun
2015

The aim of this study was to investigate the developmental trajectories of verbal aggression, physical aggression, and temper tantrums in four genetic syndrome groups. Participants were part of the Australian Child to Adult Development Study (ACAD), which collected information from a cohort of individuals with an intellectual disability at five time points over 18 years. Data were examined from a total of 248 people with one of the four following syndromes: Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, or Williams syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.c.31442DOI ListingPossible


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Jun
2015

this study aimed to investigate the cognitive and behavioral profiles, as well as the psychiatric symptoms and disorders in children with three different genetic syndromes with similar sociocultural and socioeconomic backgrounds.
thirty-four children aged 6 to 16 years, with Williams-Beuren syndrome (n=10), Prader-Willi syndrome (n=11), and Fragile X syndrome (n=13) from the outpatient clinics of Child Psychiatry and Medical Genetics Department were cognitively assessed through the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-III). Afterwards, a full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ), verbal IQ, performance IQ, standard subtest scores, as well as frequency of psychiatric symptoms and disorders were compared among the three syndromes.

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May
2012

The present study analyzes differences in parental stress in families of children with Down, Williams, Fragile X, and Prader-Willi syndromes, exploring factors that influence parental stress, such as child's characteristics, parental locus of control, and family cohesion and adaptability. Differences between mothers and fathers are also investigated. Parents were given self-report questionnaires to assess family stress, parental locus of control, and family cohesion and adaptability.

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Mar
2005

CHARGE syndrome, or Hall-Hitner syndrome (HHS), has been delineated as a common syndrome that includes coloboma, choanal atresia, cranial nerve dysfunction (particularly asymmetric facial palsy and neurogenic swallowing problems), characteristic ear abnormalities, deafness with hypoplasia of the cochlea and semicircular canals, genital hypoplasia, and variable heart defects, orofacial clefting, tracheo-esophageal fistula, renal anomalies, thymic/parathyroid hypoplasia, spine anomalies, short broad neck with sloping shoulders, and characteristic facial features. We conducted behavioral and personality assessments in 14 boys with HHS syndrome aged 6-21 years, and compared their characteristics with similar data from 20 age-matched boys with Down syndrome (DS), 17 boys with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), and 16 boys with Williams syndrome (WS). We used the Reiss Profile of Fundamental Goals and Motivation Sensitivities, the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), and the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC).

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Dec
2013

In this study we describe by use of accelerometers the total physical activity (PA), intensity pattern and walking capacity in 87 persons age 16-45 years with Down syndrome (DS), Williams syndrome (WS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Participants were recruited from all over Norway, and lived either with their parents or in community residences with support. On average the participants generated 294 counts per minute (cpm) or 6712 steps per day, with most of the day spent in sedentary activity, 522 min/day, followed by 212 min/day in light PA, 71 min/day in lifestyle activity and 27 min/day in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

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