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Sep
2015

To investigate the language needs of residents of aged care facilities within the State of Victoria, Australia, and determine what language resources were accessible to them.
Postal questionnaires were sent to 586 aged care facilities, enquiring about residents' and staff members' languages and language-specific resources.
The response rate was 38%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajag.12200DOI ListingPossible


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Sep
2017

There is a need to better understand the use of aged care services by people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence of people living in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) who were born in non-English-speaking countries and/or have a preferred language other than English and to describe service utilisation rates.The present study consisted of a secondary analysis of data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare National Aged Care Data Clearinghouse.

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Mar
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Dec
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