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Dec
2015

Demographic changes are increasing the pressure to improve therapeutic strategies against cognitive decline in Alzheimer disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Besides drug treatment, physical activity seems to be a promising intervention target as epidemiological and clinical studies suggest beneficial effects of exercise training on cognition. Using comparable inclusion and exclusion criteria, we analyzed the efficacy of drug therapy (cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, and Ginkgo biloba) and exercise interventions for improving cognition in AD and MCI populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jagp.2015.07.007DOI ListingPossible


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Dec
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Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is etiologically heterogeneous, and a substantial proportion of MCI subjects will develop different dementia disorders. One subtype of this syndrome, amnestic MCI, occurs preferentially but not exclusively in prodromal AD and is characterized by defined deficits of episodic memory.
For a 2-year, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study MCI patients, presenting with an amnestic syndrome but not necessarily based on presumed prodromal AD were randomized.

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Dec
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Non-pharmacological interventions, including cognition-based intervention and physical exercise, are available for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), but their efficacy remains uncertain.
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We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, and BIOSIS previews to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that involved cognition-based intervention and physical exercise for persons who were diagnosed with MCI.

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Feb
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Non-pharmacological interventions may improve cognition and quality of life, reduce disruptive behaviors, slow progression from Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) to dementia, and delay institutionalization. It is important to look at their trial designs as well as outcomes to understand the state of the evidence supporting non-pharmacological interventions in Alzheimer's disease (AD). An analysis of trial design strengths and limitations may help researchers clarify treatment effect and design future studies of non-pharmacological interventions for MCI related to AD.

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Nov
2007

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) refers to a transitional zone between normal ageing and dementia. Despite the uncertainty regarding the definition of MCI as a clinical entity, clinical trials have been conducted in the attempt to study the role of cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) currently approved for symptomatic treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer disease (AD), in preventing progression from MCI to AD. The objective of this review is to assess the effects of ChEIs (donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine) in delaying the conversion from MCI to Alzheimer disease or dementia.

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