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Oct
2016

The mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are a group of small molecules with a diverse ecological distribution among microorganisms. MAAs have a range of physiological functions, including protection against UV radiation, making them important from a biotechnological perspective. In the present study, we identified a putative MAA (mys) gene cluster in two New Zealand isolates of Scytonema cf.
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http://aem.asm.org/content/early/2016/07/25/AEM.01633-16.ful
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http://aem.asm.org/content/82/19/5951.full.pdf
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01633-16
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5038028PMCFound

Similar Publications

Oct
2016

Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are an important class of secondary metabolites known for their protection against UV radiation and other stress factors. Cyanobacteria produce a variety of MAAs, including shinorine, the active ingredient in many sunscreen creams. Bioinformatic analysis of the genome of the soil-dwelling cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum stagnale PCC 7417 revealed a new gene cluster with homology to MAA synthase from Nostoc punctiforme This newly identified gene cluster is unusual because it has five biosynthesis genes (mylA to mylE), compared to the four found in other MAA gene clusters.

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Aug
2014

Mycosporines and mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), including shinorine (mycosporine-glycine-serine) and porphyra-334 (mycosporine-glycine-threonine), are UV-absorbing compounds produced by cyanobacteria, fungi, and marine micro- and macroalgae. These MAAs have the ability to protect these organisms from damage by environmental UV radiation. Although no reports have described the production of MAAs and the corresponding genes involved in MAA biosynthesis from Gram-positive bacteria to date, genome mining of the Gram-positive bacterial database revealed that two microorganisms belonging to the order Actinomycetales, Actinosynnema mirum DSM 43827 and Pseudonocardia sp.

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Jul
2010

In the present investigation we show for the first time that bioconversion of a primary mycosporine-like amino acid (MAA) into a secondary MAA is regulated by sulfur deficiency in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937. This cyanobacterium synthesizes the primary MAA shinorine (RT = 2.2 min, lambda(max) = 334 nm) under normal conditions (PAR + UV-A + UV-B); however, under sulfur deficiency, a secondary MAA palythine-serine (RT = 3.

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Dec
2008

The mycosporine-like amino acid (MAA) profile of a rice-field cyanobacterium, Anabaena doliolum, was studied under PAR and PAR + UVR conditions. The high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of water-soluble compounds reveals the biosynthesis of three MAAs, mycosporine-glycine (lambda (max) = 310 nm), porphyra-334 (lambda (max) = 334 nm) and shinorine (lambda (max) = 334 nm), with retention times of 4.1, 3.

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