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Dec
1969

Previous network studies in chronic schizophrenia patients revealed impaired structural organization of the brain's rich-club members, a set of highly interconnected hub regions that play an important integrative role for global brain communication. Moreover, impaired rich-club connectivity has also been found in unaffected siblings of schizophrenia patients, suggesting that abnormal rich-club connectivity is related to familiar, possibly reflecting genetic, vulnerability for schizophrenia. However, no study has yet investigated whether structural rich-club organization is also impaired in individuals with a clinical risk syndrome for psychosis.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5464048PMCFound
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbw110DOI ListingPossible


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