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Jun
2017

Background There is evidence for two different types and/or sources of mental illness stigma, namely the display of psychiatric symptoms and the use of psychiatric service institutions. However, no current study has compared the two. Furthermore, gaps exist in our knowledge of both types of stigma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00406-016-0729-yDOI ListingPossible


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