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Dec
1969

Preliminary studies support the effect of acupressure in managing agitation in people with dementia (PWD). However, procedures for the selection of intervention ingredients and specifications of the implementation techniques are lacking. This lack of information hinders further studies on the effect of acupressure and its subsequent clinical uses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000461697DOI ListingPossible


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Dec
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