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Apr
2017

Perceptions of dangerousness are an influential component of mental health stigma and can be driven by the display of psychiatric symptoms and the use of psychiatric service institutions. Yet, no previous study compared symptoms and service use associated perceptions of dangerousness. Therefore, we conducted a representative survey (Nā€‰=ā€‰2,207) in the canton of Basel-Stadt, Switzerland.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5377934PMCFound
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep45716DOI ListingPossible


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Jun
2017

Background There is evidence for two different types and/or sources of mental illness stigma, namely the display of psychiatric symptoms and the use of psychiatric service institutions. However, no current study has compared the two. Furthermore, gaps exist in our knowledge of both types of stigma.

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Dec
1969

Image of Madness was always strongly linked with the notion of "dangerousness", provoking fear and social exclusion, despite the evolution of psychiatric practices and organisation, and the emphasis on user's rights respect. Mediatization and politicization of this issue through news item combining crime and mental illness, reinforce and spread out this perception. This paper presents a review of the litterature on social perceptions associating "dangerousness", "Insanity" and "mental illness", available data about the link between "dangerous states" and "psychiatric disorders", as well as the notion of "dangerousness" and the assessment of "dangerous state" of people suffering or not from psychiatric disorders.

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Aug
2004

The main purpose of this study is to examine whether the relationship between familiarity with mental illness and stigmatizing attitudes about mental illness, which had been observed in a previous study based on a sample of community college students (Psychiatr. Serv. 52 (2001) 953), can be replicated using data from a representative population survey.

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Aug
2011

Mental disorders are common in young people, yet many do not seek help. The use of psychiatric labels to describe mental disorders is associated with effective help-seeking choices, and is promoted in community awareness initiatives designed to improve help-seeking. However these labels may also be coupled with stigmatizing beliefs and therefore inhibit help-seeking: lay mental health or non-specific labels may be less harmful.

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