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Sep
2017

There is only limited agreement with respect to location, directionality and functional implications of brain structural alterations observed in patients with schizophrenia. Additionally, their link to occurrence of psychotic symptoms remains unclear. A viable way of addressing these questions is to examine populations in an at-risk mental state (ARMS) before the transition to psychosis.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5573573PMCFound


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Nov
2013

Previous studies have reported alterations in grey matter volume and cortical thickness in individuals at high risk of developing psychosis and patients in the early stages of the disorder. Because these studies have typically focused on either grey matter volume or cortical thickness separately, the relationship between these two types of alterations is currently unclear. In the present investigation we used both voxel-based cortical thickness (VBCT) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to examine neuroanatomical differences in 21 individuals with an At Risk Mental State (ARMS) for psychosis, 26 patients with a First Episode of Psychosis (FEP) and 24 healthy controls.

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Aug
2012

Although individuals vulnerable to psychosis show brain volumetric abnormalities, structural alterations underlying different probabilities for later transition are unknown. The present study addresses this issue by means of voxel-based morphometry (VBM).
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Feb
2015

Early intervention research in schizophrenia has suggested that brain structural alterations might be present in subjects at high risk of developing psychosis. The heterogeneity of regional effects of these changes, which is established in schizophrenia, however, has not been explored in prodromal or high-risk populations. We used high-resolution MRI and voxel-based morphometry (VBM8) to analyze grey matter differences in 43 ultra high-risk subjects for psychosis (meeting ARMS criteria, identified through CAARMS interviews), 24 antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients and 49 healthy controls (groups matched for age and gender).

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Nov
2013

As cannabis use is more frequent in patients with psychosis than in the general population and is known to be a risk factor for psychosis, the question arises whether cannabis contributes to recently detected brain volume reductions in schizophrenic psychoses. This study is the first to investigate how cannabis use is related to the cingulum volume, a brain region involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, in a sample of both at-risk mental state (ARMS) and first episode psychosis (FEP) subjects. A cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of manually traced cingulum in 23 FEP and 37 ARMS subjects was performed.

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