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Dec
1969

Substance-dependent individuals often lack the ability to adjust decisions flexibly in response to the changes in reward contingencies. Prediction errors (PEs) are thought to mediate flexible decision-making by updating the reward values associated with available actions. In this study, we explored whether the neurobiological correlates of PEs are altered in alcohol dependence.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5413198PMCFound
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2017.04.010DOI ListingPossible


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