Helping You Find Full Text Journal Articles

Dec
1969

Ten patients with probable Alzheimer's disease participated in an open-label study of buspirone for agitation. The starting dose of 15 mg/day was increased by 5 mg every week until maximal improvement or 60 mg/day was reached. A significant decrease in agitation scores occurred at an average dose of 35 mg/day.
Full Text Link Source Status
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00019442-199300110-00011DOI ListingPossible


Similar Publications

Dec
1969

Buspirone, a nonbenzodiazepine anxiolytic, has been shown to decrease aggression in animal models and reduce agitation in a small number of patients with organic brain syndromes. An open pilot study was conducted to assess the usefulness of buspirone in managing agitation and aggression in elderly dementia patients. Sixteen patients, ages 65-89, with various types of dementia associated with severe agitation and aggression were treated with buspirone.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Jan
2003

Anxiety symptoms are experienced by the majority of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Generalized anxiety disorder may occur in 5-6% of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Anxiety symptoms may underlie agitation and aggression.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Jan
2003

The authors report on a pilot double-blind comparison of buspirone with haloperidol in the treatment of agitation manifested by physical tension and motor activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A group of 26 nursing home residents underwent a 10-week comparison of 15 mg buspirone (n = 12) vs. 1.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Dec
1969

Haloperidol for agitation in dementia.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2001 (4):CD002852
E Lonergan, J Luxenberg, J Colford
Agitation includes wandering, crying out, abusive vocalization, and assaultive behavior and occurs in up to 70% of patients with dementia. Although the neuroleptic haloperidol has been used for decades to control disruptive behavior in psychotic and demented patients, the effectiveness of this drug for agitated dementia remains in question. The first meta-analysis on the effectiveness of haloperidol for agitated dementia, published in 1990, was limited in scope and was unable to provide clear guidelines for the use of haloperidol for demented patients who are agitated.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.
Back to top