Helping You Find Full Text Journal Articles

Dec
2016

Suspecting significance behind ordinary events is a common feature in psychosis and it is assumed to occur due to aberrant salience attribution. The Salience Attribution Test (SAT; Roiser et al., 2009) measures aberrant salience as a bias towards one out of two equally reinforced cue features as opposed to adaptive salience towards features indicating high reinforcement.
Full Text Link Source Status
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5514317PMCFound
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scog.2016.10.001DOI ListingPossible


Similar Publications

Dec
1969

We sought to validate the psychometric properties of a recently developed paradigm that aims to measure salience attribution processes proposed to contribute to positive psychotic symptoms, the Salience Attribution Test (SAT). The "aberrant salience" measure from the SAT showed good face validity in previous results, with elevated scores both in high-schizotypy individuals, and in patients with schizophrenia suffering from delusions. Exploring the construct validity of salience attribution variables derived from the SAT is important, since other factors, including latent inhibition/learned irrelevance (LIrr), attention, probabilistic reward learning, sensitivity to probability, general cognitive ability and working memory could influence these measures.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Jun
2016

It has been suggested that positive psychotic symptoms reflect 'aberrant salience'. Previously we provided support for this hypothesis in first-episode schizophrenia patients, demonstrating that delusional symptoms were associated with aberrant reward processing, indexed by the Salience Attribution Test (SAT). Here we tested whether salience processing is abnormal in schizophrenia patients with long-standing treatment-refractory persistent delusions (TRS).

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Jan
2016

A dysfunctional differentiation between self-relevant and irrelevant information may affect the perception of environmental stimuli as abnormally salient. The aberrant salience hypothesis assumes that positive symptoms arise from an attribution of salience to irrelevant stimuli accompanied by the feeling of self-relevance. Self-referential processing relies on the activation of cortical midline structures which was demonstrated to be impaired in psychosis.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Feb
2009

It has been suggested that some psychotic symptoms reflect 'aberrant salience', related to dysfunctional reward learning. To test this hypothesis we investigated whether patients with schizophrenia showed impaired learning of task-relevant stimulus-reinforcement associations in the presence of distracting task-irrelevant cues.
We tested 20 medicated patients with schizophrenia and 17 controls on a reaction time game, the Salience Attribution Test.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.
Back to top