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Oct
1986

Download: My body, my property.

Hastings Cent Rep 1986 Oct;16(5):28-38
L B Andrews
Two recent cases raise the question: Should the body be considered a form of property? Patients generally do not share in the profits derived from the applications of research on their body parts and products. Nor is their consent for research required so long as the body part is unidentified and is removed in the course of treatment. A market in body parts and products would require consent to all categories of research and ensure that patients are protected from coercion and given the chance to be paid fairly for their contributions.
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Apr
1993

The increasing potential for commercial applications in biotechnology has given rise to new legal and ethical questions with regard to ownership of human tissue. As the potential value of human cells and tissue has risen, so have donors' calls for a share in the profits. However, in a recent California ruling (John Moore vs the Regents of the University of California), the court once again held to its traditional position that individuals do not hold property rights in their own tissue and cells.

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