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Nov
1985

Cardiac illness in myotonic muscular dystrophy (MyD) is infrequent, but subclinical cardiac involvement in MyD is very common (found in 42 of 46 subjects) and may be responsible for sudden death. In this series, we found ECG abnormalities in 72%, left ventricular dysfunction in 70%, mitral valve prolapse in 37%, and sudden death in 4%. Four deaths during the study period were due to acute left ventricular failure, one to sepsis and respiratory insufficiency, and one was unexplained.
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Jan
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Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most frequent muscular dystrophy in adults. DM1 is a multisystem disorder also affecting the heart with an increased incidence of sudden death, which has been explained with the common impairment of the conduction system often requiring pacemaker implantation; however, the occurrence of sudden death despite pacemaker implantation and the observation of major ventricular arrhythmias generated the hypothesis that ventricular arrhythmias may play a causal role as well. The aim of the study was to assess the 2-year cumulative incidence and the value of noninvasive and invasive findings as predictive factors for sudden death, resuscitated cardiac arrest, ventricular fibrillation, sustained ventricular tachycardia and severe sinus dysfunction or high-degree atrioventricular block.

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Jun
2008

Sudden death can occur as a consequence of cardiac-conduction abnormalities in the neuromuscular disease myotonic dystrophy type 1. The determinants of the risk of sudden death remain imprecise.
We assessed whether the electrocardiogram (ECG) was useful in predicting sudden death in 406 adult patients with genetically confirmed myotonic dystrophy type 1.

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Jun
2009

Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is a genetically determined disease with autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Relatively recently, MD has been divided into two sub-types (MD1 and MD2). Clinical symptoms of MD1 result from the expansion of a (CTG)n trinucleotide of the gene coding for serine/threonine protein kinase and clinical symptoms in MD2 are associated with the expansion of (CCTG)n in I intron of the zinc-finger protein 9 (ZNF9).

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Nov
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The presence, degree and frequency of disorders of cardiac conduction and rhythm and of regional or global myocardial dystrophy or myotonia have not previously been studied prospectively and systematically in the same population of patients with myotonic dystrophy. Accordingly, 25 adults with classic Steinert's disease underwent electrocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, vectorcardiography, chest x-rays, echocardiography, electrophysiologic studies, and technetium-99m angiography. Clinically important cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy reside in specialized tissues rather than in myocardium.

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