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'Bedside Ultrasonography Peripheral Line Placement' (4)


Dec
2016

BACKGROUND Central venous catheterization is a common tool used in critically ill patients to monitor central venous pressure and administer fluids and medications such as vasopressors. Here we present a case of a missing guide wire after placement of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC), which was incidentally picked up by bedside ultrasound in the intensive care unit.  CASE REPORT A 50-year-old Hispanic male was admitted to the intensive care unit for alcohol intoxication.

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Dec
2016

Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are being increasingly placed at the bedside by trained vascular access professional such as nurses. This is to increase the availability of the service, for cost containment, and to reduce the workload on the interventional radiologist. We describe a single institution experience with over 700 PICC lines placed by trained nurses at the bedside and determine the success rate, malposition rate of the PICC line , degree of support needed from the Interventional radiologist, and factors affecting a successful placement of a PICC line by the nurses.

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Dec
2016

Pulmonary embolism remains an endemic challenge for public health care. The first line of treatment for venous thromboembolic disorder has been anticoagulation; however, in the absence of appropriate pharmacologic treatment, because of failure or contraindication, caval filter placement has been widely performed in the prevention of pulmonary embolism. Initially an open surgical procedure, technological advancements have allowed filter placement to be done percutaneously.

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Mar
1989

Double-lumen hemodialysis catheters designed to be placed via a subclavian vein approach have gained rapid acceptance over the past several years. Several studies have shown a significant rate of subclavian vein stenosis or occlusion after placement of these catheters. A large number of these patients require repeat placement of catheters with access often becoming increasingly difficult to obtain.

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