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'Central Venous Access Subclavian Vein Subclavian Approach' (173)


Dec
2017

The superiority of surgical cut-down of the cephalic vein versus percutaneous catheterization of the subclavian vein for the insertion of totally implantable venous access devices (TIVADs) is debated. To compare the safety and efficacy of surgical cut-down versus percutaneous placement of TIVADs. This is a single-institution retrospective cohort study of oncologic patients who had TIVADs implanted by 14 surgeons.

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Dec
2017

To describe and analyze the complications of subcutaneous venous access port for patients with gastrointestinal malignancy.
Data of 1 912 patients with gastrointestinal malignancy who accepted chemotherapy in our department via subcutaneous venous access ports, including 127 cases in upper arm, 865 cases in subclavicular vein and 920 cases in internal jugular vein, from June 2007 to April 2016 were analyzed retrospectively. Associated complications and risk factors were emphatically investigated.

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Nov
2017

We investigated whether visual augmentation (3D, real-time, color visualization) of a procedural simulator improved performance during training in the supraclavicular approach to the subclavian vein, not as widely known or used as its infraclavicular counterpart.
To train anesthesiology residents to access a central vein, a mixed reality simulator with emulated ultrasound imaging was created using an anatomically authentic, 3D-printed, physical mannequin based on a computed tomographic scan of an actual human. The simulator has a corresponding 3D virtual model of the neck and upper chest anatomy.

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Dec
1969

The correct choice of intra vascular access in critically ill neonates should be individualized depending on the type and duration of therapy, gestational and chronological age, weight and/or size, diagnosis, clinical status, and venous system patency. Accordingly, there is an ongoing demand for optimization of catheterization. Recently, the use of ultrasound (US)-guided cannulation of the subclavian vein (SCV) has been described in children and neonates.

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Aug
2017

The use of ultrasound (US) has been proposed to reduce the number of complications and to increase the safety and quality of central venous catheter (CVC) placement. In this review, we describe the rationale for the use of US during CVC placement, the basic principles of this technique, and the current evidence and existing guidelines for its use. In addition, we recommend a structured approach for US-guided central venous access for clinical practice.

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Sep
2017

To assess the indications, safety and outcomes of tunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) placed via a cutdown approach into the axillary vein in children, an approach not well described in this population.
A retrospective cohort study was performed on pediatric patients who received CVCs via open cannulation of the axillary vein or one of its tributaries between January 2006 and October 2016 at two hospitals.
A total of 24 axillary CVCs were placed in 20 patients [10 male (42%); mean weight 7.

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Jan
2017

To study the variability of techniques used for vascular access of central venous devices, totally implanted and external tunneled, as well as polling the use of ultrasound by pediatric surgeons in Spain.
Descriptive study of a survey results, conducted by phone, email and online, about 20 items related to the placement of these devices in children and the use of ultrasound in this procedure.
We analyzed 71 surveys from 31 national hospitals.

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Apr
2017

The axillary vein is an easily accessible vessel that can be used for ultrasound-guided central vascular access and offers an alternative to the internal jugular and subclavian veins. The objective of this study was to identify which transducer orientation, longitudinal or transverse, is better for imaging the axillary vein with ultrasound.
We analyzed 236 patients who had undergone central venous cannulation of axillary vein in this retrospective study.

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May
2017

The aim of our study was revised as follows: to clarify the postoperative complications of multifunctional central venous ports and the risk factors for such complications to promote the safe use of the PowerPort system in the hospital.
The study group comprised 132 patients in whom implantable central venous access ports (PowerPort) were placed in our hospital from March 2014 through December 2015. The approach used for port placement was the subclavian vein in 43 patients (33%), the internal jugular vein in 87 patients (66%), and the femoral vein in 2 patients (1%).

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Feb
2017

Central venous access in critically ill, small infants remains technically challenging even in experienced hands. Several vascular accesses exist, but the subclavian vein is often preferred for central venous catheter insertion in infants where abdominal malformation and/or closure of the vein preclude the use of umbilical venous catheters, as catheterization of the subclavian vein is easier in very short necks than the internal jugular vein for age-related anatomical reasons. The subclavian vein approach is yet relatively undescribed in low birth weight infants (i.

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Feb
2017

The central venous access port (CVAP) has played an important role in the safe administration of chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition. The aim of the present study was to clarify the optimal access vein for CVAP implantation when performed by residents rather than attending surgeons.
A consecutive cases of CVAP implantation via the subclavian vein (SV) using a landmark-guided technique or via the internal jugular vein (JV) using an ultrasound-guided technique were divided into 2 groups according to whether the intervention was performed by a resident or an attending surgeon.

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Dec
1969

Central vein cannulation is one of the most commonly performed procedures in intensive care. Traditionally, the jugular and subclavian vein are recommended as the first choice option. Nevertheless, these attempts are not always obtainable for critically ill patients.

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Mar
2017

The external jugular vein (EJV) approach for totally implantable venous access devices (TIVADs) is safe. However, the success rate is unsatisfactory because of the difficulty in catheterization due to the acute angle between the EJV and the subclavian vein (SCV). A novel "shrug technique" to overcome this difficulty was developed, and its efficacy was assessed in a consecutive case series.

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Dec
2017

The common femoral artery is the standard site for immediate vascular access when initiating adult venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. However, this approach is fraught with problems such as femoral artery occlusion, distal limb ischemia, reperfusion injury resulting in compartment syndrome, retroperitoneal hemorrhage, thrombosis, embolization, and most importantly, pulmonary edema. Here, we show our preference of using the subclavian artery with a side graft as a different cannulation technique for outflow of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, which can avoid complications associated with different access techniques.

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Oct
2017

This new laser facilitated 'inside-out' technique was used for transvenous pacemaker insertion in a pacemaker-dependent patient with bilateral subclavian occlusion and a failed epicardial system who is not suitable for a transfemoral approach.
Procedure was undertaken under general anaesthesia with venous access obtained from right femoral vein and left axillary vein. 7F multipurpose catheter was used to enter proximal edge of the occluded segment of subclavian vein via femoral approach, which then supported stiff angioplasty wires and microcatheters to tunnel into the body of occlusion.

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Sep
2016

The current study aims to compare the application and convenience of the upper arm port with the other two methods of implanted ports in the jugular vein and the subclavian vein in patients with gastrointestinal cancers.
Currently, the standard of practice is placement of central venous access via an internal jugular vein approach. Perioperative time, postoperative complications, and postoperative comfort level in patients receiving an implanted venous port in the upper arm were retrospectively compared to those in the jugular vein and the subclavian vein from April 2013 to November 2014.

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Dec
2016

We aimed to determine the success rate and any complications using a percutaneous approach to the femoral vein (FV) for placement of a totally implantable access port (TIVAP), with a preoperative assessment of the femoral and iliac veins using computed tomography-venography (CT-V).
A prospective study of 72 patients was conducted where placement of a TIVAP was attempted via the right FV, with the port placed in the anterior thigh, when subclavian vein or jugular vein access was contraindicated. Preoperative assessment of the femoral venous plexus was performed with CT-V in 72 patients.

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Sep
2016

12th WINFOCUS world congress on ultrasound in emergency and critical care.

Crit Ultrasound J 2016 Sep;8(Suppl 1):12
Yahya Acar, Onur Tezel, Necati Salman, Erdem Cevik, Margarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-Bordomás, Mustafa Z Mahmoud, Abdelmoneim Sulieman, Abbas Ali, Alrayah Mustafa, Ihab Abdelrahman, Mustafa Bahar, Osama Ali, H Lester Kirchner, Gregor Prosen, Ajda Anzic, Paul Leeson, Maryam Bahreini, Fatemeh Rasooli, Houman Hosseinnejad, Gabriel Blecher, Robert Meek, Diana Egerton-Warburton, Edina Ćatić Ćuti, Stanko Belina, Tihomir Vančina, Idriz Kovačević, Nadan Rustemović, Ikwan Chang, Jin Hee Lee, Young Ho Kwak, Do Kyun Kim, Chi-Yung Cheng, Hsiu-Yung Pan, Chia-Te Kung, Ela Ćurčić, Ena Pritišanac, Ivo Planinc, Marijana Grgić Medić, Radovan Radonić, Abiola Fasina, Anthony J Dean, Nova L Panebianco, Patricia S Henwood, Oliviero Fochi, Moreno Favarato, Ezio Bonanomi, Ivan Tomić, Youngrock Ha, Hongchuen Toh, Elizabeth Harmon, Wilma Chan, Cameron Baston, Gail Morrison, Frances Shofer, Angela Hua, Sharon Kim, James Tsung, Isa Gunaydin, Zeynep Kekec, Mehmet Oguzhan Ay, Jinjoo Kim, Jinhyun Kim, Gyoosung Choi, Dowon Shim, Ji-Han Lee, Jana Ambrozic, Katja Prokselj, Miha Lucovnik, Gabrijela Brzan Simenc, Asta Mačiulienė, Almantas Maleckas, Algimantas Kriščiukaitis, Vytautas Mačiulis, Andrius Macas, Sharad Mohite, Zoltan Narancsik, Hugon Možina, Sara Nikolić, Jan Hansel, Rok Petrovčič, Una Mršić, Simon Orlob, Markus Lerchbaumer, Niklas Schönegger, Reinhard Kaufmann, Chun-I Pan, Chien-Hung Wu, Sarah Pasquale, Stephanie J Doniger, Sharon Yellin, Gerardo Chiricolo, Maja Potisek, Borut Drnovšek, Boštjan Leskovar, Kristine Robinson, Clara Kraft, Benjamin Moser, Stephen Davis, Shelley Layman, Yusef Sayeed, Joseph Minardi, Irmina Sefic Pasic, Amra Dzananovic, Anes Pasic, Sandra Vegar Zubovic, Ana Godan Hauptman, Ana Vujaklija Brajkovic, Jaksa Babel, Marina Peklic, Vedran Radonic, Luka Bielen, Peh Wee Ming, Nur Hafiza Yezid, Fatahul Laham Mohammed, Zainal Abidin Huda, Wan Nasarudin Wan Ismail, W Yus Haniff W Isa, Hashairi Fauzi, Praveena Seeva, Mohd Zulfakar Mazlan
A1 Point-of-care ultrasound examination of cervical spine in emergency departmentYahya Acar, Onur Tezel, Necati SalmanA2 A new technique in verifying the placement of a nasogastric tube: obtaining the longitudinal view of nasogastric tube in addition to transverse view with ultrasoundYahya Acar, Necati Salman, Onur Tezel, Erdem CevikA3 Pseudoaneurysm of the femoral artery after cannulation of a central venous line. Should we always use ultrasound in these procedures?Margarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA4 Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization. A novel approach in emergency departmentMargarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA5 Clinical ultrasound in a septic and jaundice patient in the emergency departmentMargarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA6 Characterization of the eyes in preoperative cataract Saudi patients by using medical diagnostic ultrasoundMustafa Z.

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Sep
2016

To compare internal jugular vein and subclavian vein access for central venous catheterization in terms of success rate and complications.
A 1:1 randomized controlled trial.
Baskent University Medical Center.

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Sep
2016

Point-of-care ultrasound guidance using a linear probe is well established as a tool to increase safety when performing a supradiaphragmatic cannulation of the internal jugular central vein. However, little data exist on which probe is best for performing a supradiaphragmatic cannulation of the subclavian vein.
This was a prospective, observational study at a single-site emergency department, where 5 different physician sonologists evaluate individual practice preference for visualization of the subclavian vein using a supraclavicular approach with 2 different linear probes and 1 endocavitary probe.

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Jan
2016

Totally implantable vascular access devices (TIVADs) are indicated for intermittent long-term intravenous access. It is widely accepted within medical literature that TIVADs are associated with statistically significant lower infection rates than other central venous access devices. Typical sites for implantation are on the anterior chest wall, using the internal jugular, axillary, cephalic or a subclavian vein.

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Jan
2016

Totally implantable vascular access devices (TIVADs) are indicated for intermittent long-term intravenous access. It is widely accepted within medical literature that TIVADs are associated with statistically significant lower infection rates than other central venous access devices. Typical sites for implantation are on the anterior chest wall, using the internal jugular, axillary, cephalic or a subclavian vein.

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Sep
2016

The ultrasound-guided central venous catheter (CVC) guidewire tip positioning has been demonstrated for catheterization of the right internal jugular vein. We explored the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided right subclavian vein (RScV) CVC tip positioning via a right supraclavicular approach using a microconvex probe.
Twenty patients scheduled for elective surgery were consecutively included in this observational feasibility study following written informed consent.

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Apr
2016

Ultrasound guidance for vascular cannulation seems safer and more effective than an anatomical landmark approach, though it has not gained widespread support partly due to workflow interference of wired probes. A wireless ultrasound transducer (WUST) may overcome this issue. We report the effectiveness, time consumption, and safety of the first-in-human experience in axillary vein cannulation guided with a novel WUST for the implantation of cardiovascular implantable electric devices (CIEDs).

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Dec
1969

Presented herein are the results of treatment of 28 patients with stenosis/occlusion of central veins undergoing replacement therapy by means of programmed haemodialysis for terminal renal failure. The clinical symptomatology in all patients manifested itself by chronic lymphovenous insufficiency of the upper limb, dysfunction of the vascular access (14 patients, thrombosis of the vascular approach (5 patients), venous hypertension of the brain (4 patients). 17 patients had aneurysms of the vascular approach in the zone of puncture.

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Dec
1969

The anesthesiologist is frequently involved in the task of achieving central venous access either for intraoperative uses or postoperative purposes or Intensive Care Unit care. We are usually aware of the common complications of subclavian approach, such as arterial puncture, bleeding, pneumothorax, misplacement in the ipsilateral internal jugular vein (IJV) or contralateral brachiocephalic or subclavian vein. In this case report, we highlight the possibility of malpositioning of central venous cannula inserted through IJV into the anterior extra pleural plane after failed subclavian cannulation attempts.

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Dec
1969

The aim of the study reported here was to evaluate patients' satisfaction with implantation of venous access devices under local anesthesia (LA) with and without additional oral sedation.
A total of 77 patients were enrolled in the prospective descriptive study over a period of 6 months. Subcutaneous implantable venous access devices through the subclavian vein were routinely implanted under LA.

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Jul
2015

Although totally implantable venous access devices (TIVAD) are increasingly being used in oncology patients, more robust evidence about the best technique is lacking, especially regarding to ultrasound (US) guided puncture.
One hundred ten patients with indication of intravenous chemotherapy were randomly assigned to TIVAD implant through US-guided internal jugular vein (USG) puncture (39) or internal jugular vein blindly (IJB) (36) or subclavian vein blindly (SCB) (35). Procedure data and complications were prospectively recorded within 30 days of the procedure.

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Jun
2015

Ultrasound guided vascular access has been well-characterized as a safe and effective technique for internal jugular and femoral vein catheterization. However, there is limited experience with the use of ultrasound to access the infraclavicular subclavian vein. Multiple ultrasound techniques do exist to identify the subclavian vein, but real time access is limited by vessel identification in a single planar view.

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Dec
1969

Given the increasing number of elderly hemodialysis-dependent patients with concomitant chronic diseases the successful creation and maintenance of reliable vascular access become a real challenge. In current literature central vein disease (CVD) is defined as at least 50% narrowing up to total occlusion of central veins of the thorax including superior vena cava (SVC), brachiocephalic (BCV), subclavian (SCV) and internal jugular vein (IJV). The incidence of CVD has been reported to be as high as 23% in the total dialysis population and 41% in those with access related complains.

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Dec
1969

Iatrogenic damage of the innominate vein is a possible complication with extracorporeal central venous line catheter insertion techniques. When perforation occurs, the catheter is left in place and surgery is required for careful removal and repair of other possible complications, including hemothorax and cardiac tamponade. The traditional approach for innominate vein repair is via a complete median sternotomy.

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Dec
1969

The use of ultrasound (US) guidance for central vascular access in children has been advocated as a safer approach compared to traditional landmark techniques. We therefore collected data on the current use of US for central vascular access in children and infants in the Nordic countries.
A cross-sectional survey using an online questionnaire was distributed to one anaesthesiologist at every hospital in the Nordic countries; a total of 177 anaesthesiologists were contacted from July till August 2012.

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Jan
2015

The rate of iatrogenic pneumothorax associated with thoracic central venous catheterization in community emergency departments (EDs) is poorly described, although such information is vital to inform the procedure's risk/benefit analysis. We undertook this multicenter study to estimate the incidence of immediate catheter-related pneumothorax in community EDs and to determine associations with site of access, failed access, and positive pressure ventilation.
This was a secondary analysis of 2 retrospective cohort studies of adults who underwent attempted thoracic central venous catheterization in 1 of 21 EDs.

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Nov
2014

The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) is estimated at 10 to 20% in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) and often requires renal replacement therapy (RRT). ICU mortality in AKI patients can exceed 50%. Venous catheters are the preferred vascular access method for AKI patients requiring RRT, but carry a risk of catheter thrombosis or infection.

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Aug
2014

To summarize the disposal methods and the reasons of complications in operation of totally implantable central venous port (TICVP).
A total of 2 007 patients were enrolled in this observational, single-center study between December 2008 and March 2013. TICVP implantation was performed with one small skin incision and subcutaneous puncture of subclavian or jugular vein.

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Feb
2015

Totally implantable venous access ports are widely used for the administration of chemotherapy in patients with cancer. Although there are several approaches to implantation, here we describe Port-A-Cath(®) (PAC) placement by percutaneous puncture of the subclavian vein with ultrasonographic guidance.
Data on our vascular access service were collected prospectively from June 2004.

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Feb
2015

Totally implantable venous access devices (TIVADs) can be implanted by percutaneous approach (to the subclavian or internal jugular vein) or by surgical approach, through cephalic vein or external jugular vein (EJV). The authors present a review of the literature about EJV approach for TIVAD implantation.
A review of articles indexed in MEDLINE (PubMed) and Cochrane Central Register on "EJV access," "EJV cut-down," and "TIVADs" was performed, even matching the terms.

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Feb
2016

A minimal-invasive interventional technique for recanalization of complex chronic central venous total occlusions is described to overcome difficulties in case of failure of common approaches.
We present a patient with a central venous occlusion that caused severe venous congestion of her upper extremity and significant impairment of her forearm hemodialysis shunt. Since the usual transbrachial and transfemoral attempts for recanalization of occluded right subclavian, brachiocephalic, superior vena cava, and proximal internal jugular veins (IJV) failed, the approach was changed to a transjugular access.

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May
2014

The classic transvenous implantation of a permanent pacemaker in a pectoral location may be precluded by obstruction of venous access through the superior vena cava or recent infection at the implant site. When these barriers to the procedure are bilateral and there are also contraindications or technical difficulties to performing a thoracotomy for an epicardial approach, the femoral vein, although rarely used, can be a viable alternative. We describe the case of a patient with occlusion of both subclavian veins and a high risk for mini-thoracotomy or videothoracoscopy, who underwent implantation of a permanent single-chamber pacemaker via the right femoral vein.

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May
2014

Safe and reliable venous access is mandatory in modern health care, but central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, This paper describes current Swedish guidelines for clinical management of CVCs The guidelines supply updated recommendations that may be useful in other countries as well. Literature retrieval in the Cochrane and Pubmed databases, of papers written in English or Swedish and pertaining to CVC management, was done by members of a task force of the Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Consensus meetings were held throughout the review process to allow all parts of the guidelines to be embraced by all contributors.

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May
2014

Ultrasound (US)-guided internal jugular vein access has been the standard practice of central venous port (CVP) placement. The subclavian vein (SCV) access has also been preferred, but has potential risk of pinch-off syndrome (POS). The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of US-guided SCV access to avoid POS in patients with CVP.

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Jun
2014

To determine the success rate and complications of using the external jugular vein (EJV) for central venous access with a preoperative estimate of the detailed anatomical orientation of the cervical venous plexus using computed tomography venography (CT-V).
Prospective, observational human study.
Surgical intensive care unit.

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Apr
2014

The objective of this study was to determine the success rate and complications of using the percutaneous approach of the external jugular vein (EJV) for placement of a totally implantable venous-access port (TIVAP) with a preoperative estimate of the detailed anatomical orientation of the cervical venous plexus using computed tomography venography (CT-V).
A prospective cohort study of 45 patients in whom placement of a TIVAP was attempted via the right EJV was conducted. The preoperative anatomical estimation of the cervical venous plexus was performed with CT-V using a Multidetector Helical 16-section CT.

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Jan
2014

Totally implantable venous access devices (TIVADs) are commonly used in patients with cancer. Although several methods of implantation have been described, there is not enough evidence to support the use of a specific technique on a daily basis. The objective of this study was systematically to assess the literature comparing percutaneous subclavian vein puncture with surgical venous cutdown.

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Jul
2014

To determine feasibility, safety, and adoption rates of right heart catheterization (RHC) using antecubital venous access (AVA) as compared to using the traditional approach of proximal venous access (PVA).
RHC via PVA (i.e.

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Nov
2013

When subclavian access is not possible, controversy exists between the internal jugular and femoral sites for the choice of central-venous access in intensive care unit patients.
To compare infection and colonization rates of short-term jugular and femoral catheters.
Using data from two multicenter studies, we compared femoral and internal jugular for the risks of catheter-related bloodstream infection, major catheter-related infection, and catheter-tip colonization.

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Sep
2013

Central venous lines (CVLs) are frequently used in the management of many neonatal and pediatric conditions. Failure to remove the luminal part of the line (retained CVL) is rare. Consequently, there is lack of experience and consensus in its optimal management.

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Jan
2015

Totally implantable venous access port plays a crucial role in the treatment of patients in oncology. However, its use can result sporadically in catheter fracture with catheter tip embolization into pulmonary arteries.
We report this unusual but potentially serious complication in four patients.

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Aug
2013

Central venous catheterisation is a commonly performed procedure in anaesthesia, critical care, acute and emergency medicine. Traditionally, subclavian venous catheterisation has been performed using the landmark technique and because of the complications associated with this technique, it is not commonly performed in the United Kingdom - where the accepted practice is ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein catheterisation. Subclavian vein catheterisation offers particular advantages over the internal jugular and femoral vein sites such as reduced rates of line-related sepsis, improved patient comfort and swifter access in trauma situations where the internal jugular vein may not be easily accessible.

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Jan
2013

The supraclavicular approach was first put into clinical practice in 1965 by Yoffa and is an underused method for gaining central access. It offers several advantages over the conventional infraclavicular approach to the subclavian vein. At the insertion site, the subclavian vein is closer to the skin, and the right-sided approach offers a straighter path into the subclavian vein.

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