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Author: Josephine Labus (4)


May
2017

Rewiring of synaptic circuitry pertinent to memory formation has been associated with morphological changes in dendritic spines and with extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Here, we mechanistically link these processes by uncovering a signaling pathway involving the serotonin 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7R), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), the hyaluronan receptor CD44, and the small GTPase Cdc42. We highlight a physical interaction between 5-HT7R and CD44 (identified as an MMP-9 substrate in neurons) and find that 5-HT7R stimulation increases local MMP-9 activity, triggering dendritic spine remodeling, synaptic pruning, and impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP).

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Jun
2017

Precise control of dendritic spine density and synapse formation is critical for normal and pathological brain functions. Therefore, signaling pathways influencing dendrite outgrowth and remodeling remain a subject of extensive investigations. Here, we report that prolonged activation of the serotonin 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7R) with selective agonist LP-211 promotes formation of dendritic spines and facilitates synaptogenesis in postnatal cortical and striatal neurons.

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Dec
2014

The acquisition of proper dendrite morphology is a crucial aspect of neuronal development towards the formation of a functional network. The role of the extracellular matrix and its cellular receptors in this process has remained enigmatic. We report that the CD44 adhesion molecule, the main hyaluronan receptor, is localized in dendrites and plays a crucial inhibitory role in dendritic tree arborization in vitro and in vivo.

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May
2014

The blood-brain barrier is necessary to provide an optimal environment for cerebral function. It consists of endothelial cells that interact through interendothelial tight junctions and form a barrier with low permeability. Therefore, the infiltration of lymphocytes into the central nervous system is limited.

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