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Author: Kelly L Sinclair (5)


Mar
2014

Sleep and fatigue following traumatic brain injury.

Psychiatr Clin North Am 2014 Mar 10;37(1):77-89. Epub 2014 Jan 10.
Jennie L Ponsford, Kelly L Sinclair
This article reviews literature relating to sleep disturbance and fatigue after traumatic brain injury. It discusses the nature and prevalence of sleep disturbances associated with traumatic brain injury and the measures used to assess them. Potential causes are discussed, including damage to sleep-wake regulating centers, disruption of circadian timing of sleep, and secondary causes, such as pain, depression, and anxiety.

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May
2014

Fatigue is a common, persistent complaint following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Effective treatment is not well established.
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Sep
2013

Sleep changes are frequently reported following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and have an impact on rehabilitation and quality of life following injury. Potential causes include injury to brain regions associated with sleep regulation, as well as secondary factors, including depression, anxiety, and pain. Understanding the nature and causes of sleep changes following TBI represents a vital step in developing effective treatments.

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Dec
1969

The current study examined the use of actigraphy in measurement of sleep following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Twenty-one patients with TBI and self-reported sleep and/or fatigue problems and 21 non-injured controls were studied over seven days using actigraphy and sleep diary reports. Although strong associations between diary and actigraphic assessment of sleep duration were observed in both participant groups, agreement between these methods appeared to weaken in patients with TBI.

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Dec
1969

Deficits in sustained attention are common following traumatic brain injury (TBI), as a result of primary (i.e., neuropathology) and/or secondary factors (i.

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