Helping You Find Full Text Journal Articles

Search Results:

Author: Marielle C Dekker (12)


Feb
2018

Good parenting strategies can shape children's neurocognitive development, yet little is known about the nature of this relation in school-aged children and whether this association shifts with age. We aimed to investigate the relation between parenting strategies observed during a home visit and children's performance-based attentional control and executive functioning (N=98, aged 4-8years). Linear and curvilinear regression analyses showed that children of parents who were more supportive, were less intrusive, and asked more open-ended questions displayed better inhibitory control.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Dec
1969

Very little is known about the relative influence of cognitive performance-based executive functioning (EF) measures and behavioral EF ratings in explaining differences in children's school achievement. This study examined the shared and unique influence of these different EF measures on math and spelling outcome for a sample of 84 first and second graders. Parents and teachers completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF), and children were tested with computer-based performance tests from the Amsterdam Neuropsychological Tasks (ANT).

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Jul
2007

Limited information is available on gender differences and young-adult poor outcome in children and adolescents following distinct developmental trajectories of depressive symptoms.
Parent information on depressive symptoms of 4- to 18-year-olds from an ongoing Dutch community-based longitudinal multiple-cohort study (N = 2,076) was used to estimate trajectories from semi-parametric mixture models. The identified trajectories were used to predict depressive problems, general mental health problems, referral to mental health care, and educational attainment in young adulthood.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

May
2007

Six types of antisocial and delinquent behaviors (e.g., property destruction and authority avoidance) were assessed in 526 youths (11 to 24 years of age) with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities and 1,030 11- to 18-year-olds without intellectual disabilities.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

May
2007

We aimed to describe similarities and differences in the developmental course of psychopathology between children with and without intellectual disabilities (ID).
Multilevel growth curve analysis was used to analyse the developmental course of psychopathology, using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), in two longitudinal multiple-birth-cohort samples of 6- to 18-year-old children with ID (N = 978) and without ID (N = 2,047) using three repeated measurements across a 6-year period.
Children with ID showed a higher level of problem behaviours across all ages compared to children without ID.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Jan
2007

A 24-item short form of the 96-item Developmental Behaviour Checklist was developed to provide a brief measure of Total Behaviour Problem Score for research purposes. The short form Developmental Behaviour Checklist (DBC-P24) was chosen for low bias and high precision from among 100 randomly selected item sets. The DBC-P24 was developed from epidemiological data in the first three waves of the Australian Child to Adult Development study, and cross validated for groups with autism, fragile X, Prader-Willi, and Williams in this longitudinal study and in cross sectional Dutch, English, and Finnish samples of young people with intellectual disability.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Oct
2006

To study the help-seeking process of parents for emotional or behavioral problems in their child with borderline to moderate intellectual disabilities.
In 2003, in a special education-based sample of 522 youths (ages 10-18 years, response = 77.9%), we studied the parents' perception of their child's problems, their subsequent felt need for professional help, actual help-seeking, and the factors possibly related to taking these steps.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Oct
2006

To determine the extent to which the Youth Self-Report (YSR) can be used to assess emotional and behavioral problems in adolescents with intellectual disabilities (IDs).
In 2003, 281 11- to 18-year-olds with IDs (IQ > or =48) completed the YSR in an interview, and in 1993, 1,047 non-ID adolescents completed the YSR themselves. Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL).

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Aug
2003

To identify child and family factors that predict DSM-IV disorders in children with intellectual disability.
In 1997, a total of 968 6- to 18-year-olds were randomly selected from Dutch schools for intellectual disability (response 69.3%).

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Aug
2003

To assess the prevalence, comorbidity, and impact of DSM-IV disorders in 7- to 20-year-olds with intellectual disability.
A total of 474 children (response 86.8%) were randomly selected from a sample of students from Dutch schools for the intellectually disabled.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Dec
2002

The objective of the reported study was to reassess the factor structure of the Developmental Behaviour Checklist (DBC) in a large cross-cultural sample representing all levels of intellectual disability. Parent and teacher DBC ratings on a combined sample of 1536 Dutch and Australian children and adolescents (ages 3-22) with mild to profound intellectual disability were used. Principal components analyses produced five subscales: Disruptive/Antisocial, Self-Absorbed.

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Nov
2002

The main objective of this study was to assess and compare the prevalence of a wide range of emotional and behavioral problems in children with and without intellectual disability (ID).
We studied 1,041 non-residential children randomly selected from special schools for educable (IQ 60 to 80) and trainable (IQ 30 to 60) children without severe additional physical or sensory impairments, and compared them to 1,855 children randomly selected from the general population (both ages 6 to 18). Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), and teachers the Teacher's Report Form (TRF).

View Full Text PDF Listings View primary source full text article PDFs.

Back to top